A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z #

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BACK ALLEY PRINCESS

(Hong Kong 1973) 

Original Title: Ma Lu Xiao Ying Xiong

Directed by Lo Wei Produced by Raymond Chow Action by Han Ying Chieh, Mars Starring: Sam Hui, Polly Shang Kwan, Angela Mao Ying, Carter Wong, Feng Yi, Tong Liu, Han Ying Chieh, Tien Feng, Lo Wei, Billy Chan, Ma Wen Chun, Lee Kwan, Lam Ching Ying, Yuen Biao, Yuen Wah, Helen Ma, Wong Tao, Michael Hui Reviewing: Joy Sales/Fortune Star HK VCD release Genres: Drama / Comedy / Kung-Fu

Rating - 3.3 / 5

VCD Synopsis: Chilli Boy and Embroidered Pillow are two rootless drifters with a talent for all sorts of naughty acts. In a public square, they help a group of itinerant performers led by elderly Kong, to attract the crowds. Later they join Kong's group and live with them in a slum building. They often help the neighbours there with their wits. Though they have some vices with them, they gain sympathy from a lawyer, Tang, and are saved by him from being arrested when they are pick-pocketing. Then Tang brings Chilli Boy home, hoping to give him a brand-new life. Meanwhile, a series of severe things happen in the slum building. Facing the triad force, people who live there unite together to fight against them. They finally succeed to down with the triad force. Overwhelmed by praises, Chilli Boy's reveal her identity, saying: Believe it or not, I'm a girl. (122 Mins)

Views: The delightful and multi-talented Sam Hui started his film career when he signed with Golden Harvest in 1971. It wasn't long before he was left in the hands of the infamous producer & director Lo Wei, who cast him in two memorable roles in the same year. The first was The Tattooed Dragon with Jimmy Wang Yu and Sylvia Chang, with his follow-up role in Back Alley Princess – a wacky kung-fu comedy, set in modern-day (1970s) Hong Kong. Sam shares the screen with kung-fu queen, Polly Shang Kwan, who plays Chilli Boy – a guy with boobs (?). The two stars play con-artists, often staging fake fights so they can raise some money for medicine from innocent bystanders who fall for their elaborate set-up. While on the search for their next meal, the pair befriend a bunch of street performers led by Tien Feng from Young Master, The Fate Of Lee Khan, and King Boxer. Feng's troupe includes some major names such as the amazing Angela Mao Ying, Carter Wong, Chin Yuet Sang, Lee Kwan, and others. After a successful night performing and Polly proving her kung-fu skills in a rooftop match with Mao Ying and her master, the pair are asked to join the troupe and quickly accept. All seems to go well for them in their new venture until one of the younger girls of the troupe gets sold to a gangster. It all leads to Hui and Kwan stepping up to save the day and leading their new brothers and sisters on a fight-filled, rescue mission!

While the plot for Back Alley Princess sounds simple enough, this Golden Harvest production is actually pretty nuts in many ways. The film opens with a crude animated-credit-sequence, much like a cheaper version of the classic Pink Panther movies, before jumping right into the gender-bender tale of Chilli Boy and Embroidered Pillow (Hui) that may seem a little dated today. For example, Polly is portrayed as a boy for most of the movie, but when she/he must go undercover to save her friend from a gangster, Chilli Boy disguises oneself as a girl to trick them. Then, in an odd turn of events, she gives away her big reveal at the end to show that she actually is a girl..!?! Anyone who doesn't know what they are watching or understands the long-time tradition of females playing males (and vice-versa) in Chinese theatres and movies, might just be a bit lost...

Having been in the business from the late 1940s, one would have expected Lo Wei to have perfected the art of direction by this stage of the game. After all, only a year before this he provided the world with Bruce Lee's fantastic Big Boss, and Fist Of Fury, as well as a host of other classics. But he never really was the strongest director in the world. That said, it seems that 1973 was a busy year for him with no less than 5 fine features behind him – none of which were small in scale by any means, with Back Alley Princess being a prime example. Large on cast, with plenty of drama and locations, the film could have done with a trim here and there, but still proved successful enough to see Wei return with Sam and Polly a year later for its sequel, Chinatown Capers. On a good note, Back Alley Princess benefits from having plenty of comedy, lots of neat kung-fu fights, and a cast of who's-who in early 1970's Hong Kong cinema including the aforementioned troupe members and the likes of Lo Wei himself, and a young Billy Chan, Lam Ching Ying, Mars, Wong Tao, Shing Fui On, Michael Hui, Yuen Biao and Yuen Wah popping-up in the background through-out. In fact, I would go as far as to say that had Lo Wei used Jackie Chan in Sam's role, we may have seen a different back-catalog of our hero today. Of course, it would be another few years before Lo Wei and Jackie would start their working relationship, but I think this would have been a great launching vehicle for a young Chan. It was interesting to see just how many films Lo Wei had made with (the then young) Golden Harvest studios, before breaking off a few years later to direct Jackie Chan in a number of movies – albeit, with mixed results before Golden Harvest lured him away with a promising deal.

While its middle may lag somewhat to allow for plenty of drama and some comedy situations, the last 30 minutes of Back Alley Princess makes for a fun ride as Polly and Angela set out on their rescue mission and infiltrate the mobster's brothel. This kicks-off with a few short scuffles leading to a lengthy and well-choreographed, end battle as they go up against some kung-fu veterans, led by the legendary Han Ying Chieh who plays the big-baddie of the show. Hing also served as the action-choreographer, with Mars helping on the stunt-work, and is a face known to many kung-fu film fans having starred in classics such as Dragon Inn, A Touch Of Zen, Fist Of Fury, The Big Boss, and many more. Although very chop-socky in style much suited to its time and era, the fights are a lot of fun to watch and provide some great moves – although without offering anything spectacular. The great Carter Wong only really gets to let-loose towards the end of the film as he takes on 6 or 7 armed men during a kidnapping, with the rest of the troupe and Sam, joining the action for the grand finale.

Overall: While perhaps a little too long in its running time, Back Alley Princess is a fun watch nonetheless and packed with stars!

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BACK IN ACTION

(USA 1994) 

Directed by Steve DiMarco, Paul Ziller Produced by George Flak Action by Shane Cardwell Starring: Billy Blanks, Roddy Piper, Bobbie Phillips, Matt Birman, Nigel Bennett, Damon D'Oliveira, Barry Blake, Garry Robbins, David Ferry, Sam Malkin Reviewing: Hollywood UK DVD Release Genres: Martial Arts / Action / Drama

Rating - 3.5 / 5

DVD Synopsis: A notorious drug smuggling ring in Los Angeles is duped into making a deal with undercover cops. When the ruse goes astray, Police Detective Rossi (Roddy Piper) witnesses his partner brutally murdered and now he must join forces with Billy (Billy Blanks), a martial arts expert who's out for blood. (93 Mins)

Views: The period of Billy Blanks/Roddy Piper action-film team-ups in the mid-1990s, was far too short-lived for fans of the martial-arts-action film. Although they had only made 2 movies in total, this along with Tough and Deadly, the pair had an undeniable charm while sharing the screen together – something I would have loved to have seen continue, if not extended into sequels of their completed titles...

While it won't win any awards for screenplay (or acting, as most reviewers would state), with it being Karl Schiffman's first feature film as a writer, Back In Action still proves to be a highly enjoyable ride. The film is directed by Steve DiMarco, a television director who is still going strong today, and has behind many episodes on shows like Goosebumps, Kung Fu: The Legend Continues, Due South, Lost Girl, and many more. He is joined by Paul Ziller, director of martial arts features like Bloodfist 4: Die Trying, Shootfighter 2, and Moving Target, as well as a host of TV movies. It plays like any amount of 90s action-flicks that could easily have starred the likes of Jean Claude Van Damme, Olivier Gruner, or Dolph Lungren – but I think they cast the right stars for this. The acting certainly isn't the worst I've ever seen, with Piper and Blanks holding their own to some respect, but Back In Action also benefits from having the beautiful Bobbie Phillips on board. Bobbie had previously starred with Blanks in the fun sci-fi action film, TC 2000 just a year before, where she had gotten to show some sweet moves alongside the Tae-bo master as well as starring alongside Jalal Merhi, Matthias Hues, and the great Bolo Yeung himself. Unfortunately here, she doesn't get to offer anywhere near the same amount of moves but still looks great as the reputable reporter and Piper's love interest. Phillips would go on to star in Ring Of Fire 3: Lionstrike, with Don Wilson, Baywatch, X-Files, The Cape, Murder One, and star as Dee in the ridiculously popular, Showgirls. It's also worth noting that Matt Birman, who plays relentless bad-guy Chakka, has gone onto have an illustrious career in the film industry starring in over 100 films and TV shows such as Kung Fu: The Legend Continues, Sanctuary with the wonderful Mark Dacascos, Bulletproof Monk, and The Strain, as well as working in stunt-work in over 200 titles like the Robocop series, Darkman movies, Jackie Chan's Tuxedo, Shoot 'Em Up, Shazam, and many more!

In terms of action, there's definitely a lot to enjoy here, from the opening gun battle at the graveyard to Billy and Roddy's fight in the bar, it's safe to say that action fans will not be disappointed. One fight scene sees Blanks getting to kick-ass in his boxers when a set of twins break into his home to attack. Looking like a couple of rejects from a Richard Simmons workout video, the McNamara twins get kicked and flung around the apartment with force, before Billy and his sister make their escape. From there on in, there's an action scene practically every 5 or 10 minutes making Back In Action one of the most action-packed, DTV movies of its era – or perhaps to come out of Hollywood overall. And while it doesn't highlight choreography that comes anywhere close to what Hong Kong was offering at this period in time – with Blanks already appearing in Hong Kong productions such as China O'Brien 2, King Of The Kickboxers, and The Master with Jet Li – stunt choreographer Shane Cardwell still delivers some impressive scenes, no doubt aided by the extensive martial-arts-experience of Billy Blanks and wrestling background of Piper. The closing action scene on a large ship lasts almost 15 minutes, mixing martial arts and gun-play with torture and explosions, in the most brutally fun way. As B-movie as this may be, you can't deny the film its charm and energy when it comes to entertainment.

Overall: Typically American and typically 90s in style, Back In Action is an enjoyable romp, with some violent action, buddy comedy, and plenty to enjoy!

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BAD BLOOD

(Hong Kong 2010) 

Original Title: Mit Moon (aka) King Of Triads

Directed by Dennis Law Produced by Dennis Law Action by Nicky Li, Hung Kai Sen Starring: Simon Yam, Andy On, Ken Lo, Xiong Xin Xin, Michael Chan Wai Man, Jiang Liu Xia, Bernice Liu, Pinky Cheung, Eddie Cheung, Chris Lai, Lam Suet, Jack Wong

Reviewing: BonZai Taiwanese DVD Release Genres: Martial Arts / Thriller / Triad

Rating - 3.5 / 5

DVD Synopsis: Crime lord Lok Cheung On (Eddie Cheung) runs a smuggling ring in Hong Kong. He gets caught during a failed counterfeit money operation in Mainland China and is executed. After he's gone, a deadly struggle for power breaks out within the gang, with a series of murders and assassinations aimed at members of the Lok clan. One by one, the various sons and daughters, and wives and mistresses, brothers and cousins fall as they turn on each other in paranoia. The overbearing Simon Yam, the seemingly benign Bernice Liu, the crippled Andy On, the gentle Chris Lai, or the mysterious dumb girl Jiang Luxia – any of them could be the mastermind behind all the ruthless killings – or his/her next victim. (91 Mins)

Views: Dennis Law's triad-action-thriller kicks off running as a group of gangsters are chased through the streets by a large number of policemen. Dressed in Red-Ex uniforms to pass as delivery men, the gang includes the great Simon Yam, super-kickers Ken Lo and Xiong Xin Xin (Hung Yan Yan), gang boss Eddie Cheung, and the handsome Andy On. Backed into a scrap yard, the men split with Simon and Eddie escaping with a package as the rest hold back the cops with a number of impressive moves. The package in question holds two copper plates used for counterfeiting – something that their boss wants in his possession. While on the run, Eddie Cheung suddenly gets hit by a truck which leaves him flat on his back and surrounded by the police. Watching from afar, Funky (Simon Yam), stays out of sight and soon makes his way to join the rest who have since met with Zen – the more mature member of the gang, played by the one-and-only Michael Chan Wai Man (who sports an incredibly dreadful wig). It doesn't take long for Cheung to be led to his execution, leaving the gangsters short of a leader and a lot of tension among its members. Expecting to take over the role of her father, Audrey (played by Chinese/Candian actress Bernice Liu) invites her brother (Chris Lai) home for the reading of the will – something that sees them benefit from having everything left to them, all except the desired role as head of the family. That job goes to Simon, whose immediate demands anger more than a few contenders for the throne. As gang members start getting killed off and Audrey's brother dies in a car bomb, life in the crime family starts to get deadly as Audrey sets out for revenge and attempts to take control of the family, no matter what the cost!

Dennis Law has forever received nothing but bad criticism for his films – most of which do have an element of entertainment in them. He's one of the few Hong Kong directors that actually tries hard to recreate the very much-missed, golden-age of Hong Kong action-cinema, though often with flawed results. After studying film in LA, Law went on to work in real estate before Bad Blood presenter Charles Heung, coaxed him back into the movie world. Dennis worked as a producer with Johnnie To for a bit, before setting out on his own journey as a writer and director. And while both of these subjects have never been his strong point, Dennis still gets the job done, and more often than not with a great cast and crew involved, along with some pretty sweet moments that help save most of his films from being a complete car-crash...

And while it has its flaws, there are plenty of positives here in Bad Blood, with Law securing the services of his old friend (and one of my favourite directors), Herman Yau, as the film's DOP. Of course, there's that great cast he secured once again, marred by the fact that he doesn't really put the majority of his bigger-named stars to good use. Most of the greater moments are given to Andy On, Bernice Liu, and Jiang Lu Xia, with the likes of Simon Yam, Ken Lo, and Chan Wai Man coming across as very theatrical and OTT for the most part. This is all down to the script, which was written by Law himself in his typically straightforward – but very flat – way. I guess the biggest positive of Bad Blood, and what saves it, is the fight scenes which offer some of the most exciting and brilliantly choreographed action of 2010 thanks to JC Stunt Team member, Nicky Li. Having worked with Law on Fatal Contact and Fatal Move, Li once again delivers some amazing martial-arts-action joined by Huang Kai Sen, who has worked on many great movies as an actor and action-director, such as Invisible Target, Rob-B-Hood, Kiss Of The Dragon, and Black Mask. They prove to make a great team as most of the action in Bad Blood tends to be its most memorable parts. Highlights for me include the fight between Andy On and Xiong Xin Xin in the gym, the car-park fight where Andy and Jiang take on Chain Wai Man, Ken Lo, and 30 men – and any of the action scenes that shows Jiang Lu Xia, simply kicking ass.

While the fight for the throne may have served as the main story of the film, the sub-plot with Andy On and his mute friend, played by his True Legend co-star Jiang Lu Xia, was much more interesting. Aside from enjoying some one-on-one fights, the pair like to ride around town at night on their motorcycle, picking out gangs to fight against in a bizarre training method. It makes for a lot of great action and is close to the late 80's/early 90's Hong Kong style of film-making we all miss. With a hint of unspoken romance between them, I would like to have seen more of these two in the story overall. But alas, this crime-thriller is also known as the King Of Triads for a reason, although more notably should have been named Queen Of Triads, due to Bernice Liu's role as the twisted-sister Audrey. I haven't seen a lot of Bernice, and while her acting may be a little poor at times, her portrayal of Audrey is quite good. She definitely impressed in the action department also, landing a few neat moves against her opponents in the most brutal ways – although taking down some incredible fighters far too easily in my eyes...

Overall: Once you get past the flaws, Bad Blood features some fantastic martial-arts-action and stunts that will get any Hong Kong film fans excited!

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BADGES OF FURY

(China/Hong Kong 2013) 

Original Title: Bu Er Shen Tan

Directed by Wong Zi Ming Produced by Wang Chang Tian Action by Corey Yuen Kwai Starring: Wen Zhang, Jet Li, Michelle Chen, Bruce Liang, Stephen Fung, Colin Chou (Ngai Sing), Wu Jing, Josie Ho, Alex Fong, Leung Kar Yan, Cecilia Liu, Tian Liang, Lam Suet Reviewing: My Way/Kam & Ronson HK DVD Release Genres: Comedy / Martial Arts / Action 

Rating - 3.5 / 5

DVD Synopsis: In just 3 days, three cases of Smiling Murder shock Hong Kong. As he looks into the homicide, the young detective Wang Bu Er (Wen Zhang), the police station's reckless buffoon, makes a shocking statement that this is a serial murder. He and his buddy Huang Fei Hong (Jet Li) embarks on an investigation full of excitement and unexpected events. Huang may appear to be no less muddle-headed than Wang, but in reality, he is the real master of kung fu, and would, without fail,at the most crucial moments, help Wang get out of sticky situations. Wang initially believes that budding actress Liu Jin Shui (Liu Shishi) is the prime suspect, but later, she is found to be innocent. Next, he shifts his focus on her sister Dai Yiyi (Ada Liu), among others. Eventually, Wang decides to pose as Liu's boyfriend to lure out the murderer. The closer he gets to the truth, the greater the danger he is in...

Signature UK Blu-ray: When a spate of murders erupt across Hong Kong, two kick-ass martial-arts cops are assigned to the case. As the duo embark on their investigation, shocking and unexpected chaos escalates when the innocence of the prime suspect is revealed and the hunt for the serial killer turns personal. With the city plunged into fear, the detectives unveil their extraordinary fighting skills and play a deadly game to lure the killer out.

Views: With a spate of murders happening across the city that leaves every victim with a smile on their face, super-cops Wen Zhang and Jet Li set out to find who is behind them. Their only link is that all the victims were dating the same unfortunate girl, giving Zhang the idea (and chance) to date her in a bid to lure out the killer...

Badges Of Fury sounds a lot more serious than it really is. The opening five minutes of the flick lets you know exactly what kind of film you are in for from its ridiculous death scenes to its nutty opening credits, not to mention the purposely dodgy CGI. The film yanks at its audience's legs like a classic Wong Jing version of a kung-fu Naked Gun movie. From the cute and hilarious Wen Zhang dressed in a kilt for a stake-out, to the legendary Jet Li poking fun at himself and his movies (with his character here named Huang Fei Hong for example) any fans and critics who have crushed this movie because of its misleading artwork, need to go back and have another go. The 10-minute mark gives us our first exciting bout of action, as the kilted Wen takes on the awesome Collin Chou with some crazy wire-fu during a roof-top party. The fight soon moves to a stairwell where (an extensively doubled) Jet Li takes over, leaping from floor to floor with some great moves and stunts that keep things exciting. As Li flies towards Chou with his leg extended for a final move, a door between them suddenly bursts open to reveal Zhang, in a cheeky (but welcoming) up-skirt shot as he whips out his gun – and at the same time, leaves poor Jet hanging in the frame as Chou escapes!

While I can certainly see the flaws of director Wong Zi Ming's first feature, it's definitely not as bad as most people are making it out to be. I've seen worse from seasoned directors, and while it may seem insanely stupid, messy, and over-the-top at times, no one would have made the same remarks had this been a product of Hong Kong cinema's golden era. It would have been just another crazy Hong Kong movie that may have starred Chow Sing Chi and Sandra Ng respectively while exchanging Jet Li for Gordon Liu and most likely calling his character, San Te. The film is packed with so much outrageous and overly ambitious comic situations, scenes, and camera angles, it can only be best described as a live-action cartoon. And at the same time, maybe that's its problem?! For a first-time director, Badges Of Fury was a big project in terms of its execution and energy, proving to be an incredibly ambitious and innovative movie. Two first-time writers are joined by veteran Charcoal Cheung Tan (honestly), the very same man who penned classics such as Once Upon A Time In China 2 & 3, Iron Monkey, The Assassin, Wonder Seven, and The Sorcerer And The White Snake which starred Jet Li and Wen Zhang, in 2011. With having so many amazing films behind him, you would think that Badges Of Fury may have been a little bit better, but at the same time, it's clear that Charcoal has written this script in a relaxed state in knowing that it was something he didn't really have to take too seriously. I must also point out, that it's obvious that he took inspiration from his aforementioned titles in regards to the action scenes here, bringing the fantastical wire-fu style of combat into a modern-day setting.

Apart from impressing with an incredible cast (alongside its main stars) with names such as Cecilia Liu, Wu Jing, Stephen Fung, Leung Kar Yan, Michael Yse, Alex Fong, Joe Cheung, Bruce Leung, Josie Ho, Fong Hak On, Lam Tze Chung, and Lam Suet to name-but-a-few, Badges Of Fury benefits from having the legendary Corey Yuen Kwai behind the action. With no shortage of fights, Yuen finds inspiration from his OTT wire-work in Romeo Must Die, blending it with more grounded works that provide some nice moments and crazy moves. And while his style may not appeal to everyone, it definitely works for the insane cartoon approach of the film and offers a lot of fun. Aside from the aforementioned opening fight scene, there are many highlights throughout including a great fight between Jet Li and Wu Jing in an apartment, with Zhang trying to help only to get hit at every move. There's a very fun battle between Zhang and the wonderful Leung Kar Yan which I just loved (Leung Kar Yan should definitely be doing more like this), a crazy bicycle chase through Hong Kong, and a one-on-one garage fight between Zhang and Stephen Fung that packs a punch. It all leads to an epic-end-fight between Jet Li and the awesome Bruce Leung (aka Liang) who returns to form in a role that resembles his character from the epic Kung Fu Hustle, with Yuen Kwai paying homage to Jet's final battle of Once Upon A Time In China to some degree. It all proves to be highly entertaining!

I say kudos to the director for delivering a pretty entertaining film. While far from perfect, Badges Of Fury is, a murder mystery all wrapped up in some plain-crazy-fun, with a host of great fight-action and a fantastic cast list. It's most definitely not like the artwork and promo materials that most distributors seem to be putting out there, and should not be taken seriously by any means. I'll not give away the ending, but I do recommend a watch for anyone who is a fan of classic Chow Sing Chi or Wong Jing comedies. The post-credit bloopers let you see just how much fun the cast and crew had during production, which sums everything up perfectly...

*Just to note – the UK release from Signature is 4 minutes shorter than its original version, and while cut, doesn't take away too much from the viewing experience!

Overall: Playing like a live-action cartoon, Badges Of Fury does have its flaws, but proves to be harmless fun and very entertaining at the same time!

DVD Extras: Trailer, Making of Documentary

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BALLISTIC KISS

(Hong Kong 1998) 

Original Title: Sat Sat Yan, Tiu Tiu Mo (aka) Cool

Directed by Donnie Yen Produced by Donnie Yen Action by Donnie Yen, Mak Wai Cheung, Hoh Choi Chow, Kenji Tanigaki Starring: Donnie Yen, Annie Wu, Simon Lui, Vincent Kok, Jimmy Wong, Felix Lok, Karen Tong, Joe Hau, Mak Wai Cheung, Mike Woods, Yu Rong Kwong Reviewing: Universe HK DVD Release Genres: Drama / Action / Thriller

Rating - 4 / 5

DVD Synopsis: CAT is a killer drives on his pain to get revenge everyday. During his mission he meets his long awaited for WESLEY. Fierce combat starts, by mistake, CAT blackmails policewoman CARRIE as a hostage. During that period, CAT and CARRIE fall in love with each other and fight against other killers together... (92 Mins)

Views: Having done his part as an action director, or uncredited director, in many films since the start of his career, the great Donnie Yen made a point of becoming a serious director around the late 1990s. This new venture was launched with the fantastic Legend Of The Wolf, released in many western territories as The New Big Boss. It was a great debut (though not without its flaws) and was soon followed by Ballistic Kiss and Shanghai Affairs the following year - two very different projects that certainly have their moments. While the latter would highlight Donnie in an ass-kicking role akin to that of a Bruce Lee movie, the former would allow the superstar to unleash his creativity as a film-maker, as well as star as a character that (to that point) he had never portrayed before...

Donnie plays Cat, a cool hitman who has always been somewhat of a lone-wolf since leaving his job as a New York cop. When he's not killing, Cat spends most of his days talking on the phone with a radio DJ (Simon Lui), where they discuss life and morals while live-on-air. As he thinks about calling it quits, Cat agrees to one last job, when he sees an opportunity to take revenge on an old partner that double-crossed him many years ago. But when the assassination attempt goes awry, Cat makes a run for it - taking a hostage along the way as a last-ditch attempt to escape. That hostage is Carrie, a policewoman who has unknowingly been working on his case and the one woman in the neighbourhood that has always caught his eye. Even as the truth comes to light, the pair start to fall in love during their time spent together with trouble not too far behind them, as revenge is on the cards and bullets fly!

While it may prove disappointing to new fans of Donnie's (who have really only followed the powerhouse since SPL) because of its lack-of explosive fight-scenes every few minutes, Ballistic Kiss still provides enough stylish Hong Kong action that won me over – almost as if Wong Kar Wai had directed John Woo's The Killer. And as if starring and directing wasn't enough, Donnie leads the action department where he is joined by Kenji Tanigaki, Hoh Choi Chow, and the great Mak Wai Cheung – all of whom had come straight-off Legend Of The Wolf. While Hoh had only a few credits to his name by this stage and Kenji mostly bit-part credits, Mak had been on the scene from the late 1970s working on films at Shaw Brothers such as Return To The 36th Chamber, My Young Auntie, and Eight Diagram Pole Fighter, before going on to modern hits such as Yes Madam, Heart Of The Dragon, Magic Crystal, Tiger On The Beat, and other Donnie titles such as Tiger Cage 2, Fist Of Fury, and Satan Returns. In fact, his filmography is so highly impressive, he should be more widely known than he is. And while the action may seem less than usual for a Donnie Yen film and focuses more on gun-play in the heroic bloodshed sense, it still allows its star to throw some amazing moves – albeit in a very stylized way.

There's no denying that Ballistic Kiss is a damn good movie, as well as an important piece in Donnie's career. But if one thing lets the film down, I'd have to say that it's Bey Logan's script that could have done with some refining. That said, Yen works with what he has and delivers a great performance as the hitman with a heart. The lovely Annie Wu plays Carrie, the policewoman-turned-hostage who falls for Cat and does a fine job once again. I remember seeing Annie in Jackie Chan's First Strike (which was her first role), and from there in titles like Best Of The Best, Island Of Greed, and Gorgeous. It was also great to see the wonderful Mike Woods popping up for some action, having not worked with Donnie since the fun Cheetah On Fire, a good 6 years earlier. I've chatted briefly with Mike online a few times over the years, and he seems like a genuinely nice man. It's a shame we didn't get to see more of him in front of the camera after this, as he always proved to be a worthy adversary for Donnie or anyone who stood in his way. Donnie's Shanghai Affairs co-star (and star in his-own-right), the great Yu Rong Kwong, appears briefly for a fantastically memorable and action-packed, shoot-out against Yen with other cast members such as Simon Lui, Vincent Kok, Jimmy Wong, Felix Lok, and others doing a fine job...

The beautiful cinematography is courtesy of Hong Kong movie veteran Ally Wong Ka Fai, the man behind the lens on many classics such as Dreaming The Reality, Angel Terminators 2, Avenging Quartet, the remake of A Chinese Ghost Story, Donnie's own Painted Skin, and Legend Of The Wolf. Wong has also directed over 20 films during the course of his career, but to be honest I don't believe I've seen any of them so can't comment on that side of things. Regardless, the man does a fantastic job here in making Ballistic Kiss a gorgeously shot, art-house, martial-arts-thriller, with great lighting and interesting angles. On top of providing viewers with plenty of visual flairs and a steady pace, Ballistic Kiss is accompanied by a memorable score by Japanese pianist and composer, Yukie Nishimura, which reminded me a lot of a Studio Ghibli movie and works well with the overall tone of the film. Personally, I'd like to see this get a re-release on blu-ray and win the audience it deserves!

Overall: Heroic bloodshed at its most stylish and an underrated Yen flick, Ballistic Kiss is great and shows Donnie in a one-time-only role that doesn't disappoint!

DVD Extras: Cast Bio's, Trailers

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BANDITS FROM SHANTUNG

(Hong Kong 1972) 

Original Title: Shan Dong Xiang Ma

Directed by Huang Feng Produced by Raymond Chow Action by Sammo Hung Starring: Chang Yi, Sammo Hung, Pai Ying, Yi Yuan, Tien Mi, Hu Chin, Chin Yuet Sang, Cham Siu Hung, Wilson Tong, Chow Kong, Jang Jeong Kuk, Chiang Nan,Fung Ngai, Lee Ka Ting Reviewing: Joy Sales/Fortune Star HK DVD Release Genres: Traditional Kung Fu / Adventure

Rating - 3.5 / 5

DVD Synopsis: Ong, a chief of the Green Dragon Association, has been playing havoc in the Shan Tung area. Knight Yin comes to visit his fiancee Tik, but finds her house has been deserted. He is shocked and lets his frustration out on Ong's henchmen. One-legged Wolf, Ma and some people. Only Ma manages to escape from death in the ensuing fight. Tik goes back home to get some warm clothes for her mom and ambushed by Ma and his guys. Yin fights a way out but Tik is captured. At dawn, he returns to the town and asks for help from Suen who arrives in town with a valuable consignment in his escort. Yin wants to use Suen's consignment as a bait for the bandits but Suen refuses. Finally, yields to the demand after being defeated in a duel. Ong and his gangsters come back for the consignment. He brings Tik along as a hostage. As a result, Yin gets Tik back and watches Ong takes away the consignment. Back at the stronghold, Ong is exasperated and discovering that the consignment is faked. Tik is safe now, so Yin dispatches the notorious bandits right at their stronghold... (79 Mins)

Views: Director Huang Feng, who delivered one of Golden Harvest's first feature films with Angela Mao Ying's Angry River, brings another fun kung-fu adventure packed full of wild and colourful characters, exciting kung-fu battles, and Sammo Hung in a big hairy waistcoat. Bandits Of Shantung tells the simple tale of a visiting swordsman that stands-up to a gang of bullies in the province, after his fiancée is kidnapped by them. While the film opens with a bit of a slower first half hour than one would hope for, things very quickly pick-up as Yan Tie Yi arrives in town and soon comes face-to-face with the infamous bandits. It is here that we are treated to the first real fight of the film as Yan goes up against the 5th boss of the bandits in blistering showdown of blades and sharp moves, in a neatly choreographed battle with some highly entertaining moments, before he goes on to trade moves with Green Dragon Tong – another one of the bandit leaders. Yan is played by genre favourite Chang Yi, an actor and martial arts star that began his career at the Shaw Brothers in the late 60s with films like The Thundering Swordsman, The Silent Swordsman, King Cat, and the awesome Bells Of Death. It would only be a few years later that he, along with a number of other Shaw Brothers stars, would follow ex-studio producer Raymond Chow to his new company with the beloved Golden Harvest. Impressing as both an actor and on-screen fighter, Chang very quickly gained a following and went on to star in almost 100 films into the early 90s, with Sammo Hung's awesome Moon Warriors providing one of his final roles. Of course, the pair had gone back years, with Bandits From Shantung being one of their earliest after The Fast Sword and Brothers Five – with both going on to share the screen many times over the years in films such as Lady Whirlwind, The Traitorous, and Where's Officer Tuba?

As the 5th Boss, Sammo Hung doesn't really get past the previously mentioned fight scene as he gets pulverised into the ground by Chang and killed off pretty quick. Although it is safe to say that as the choreographer, Sammo most certainly gave himself one of the more entertaining fights of the film – of course, sticking around to choreograph the rest of the action in the film which were all pretty enjoyable. This was an exciting year for Hung with the birth of the new studio that allowed him a bit more freedom to do what he wanted, having already spent a good decade in the industry as an actor and choreographer flitting between Shaw Brothers productions and more – fast making a name for himself as a man of many talents. The always wonderful Pai Ying co-stars as the bandit chief, holding back all his moves until the final battle against Chang Yi. As well as starring in King Hu classics like Dragon Inn and A Touch Of Zen, Pai joined the Golden Harvest train early on to appear in films such as The Invincible Eight and Angry River, as well as starring in a number of other independent productions. Much like Chang Yi, Pai would continue to work with Sammo over the years from Lady Whirlwind and Hapkido to The Fate Of Lee Khan and The Valiant Ones, going on to star in over 100 films through to the turn-of-the-century.

Director Huang Feng has certainly delivered a number of classic titles over the years, and many of which saw the participation of Sammo Hung and Angela Mao Ying, in one way or another. These include films such as The Angry River, Lady Whirlwind, Hapkido, When Taekwondo Strikes, Stoner, The Tournament, The Legendary Strike, and the awesome Shaolin Plot. I must also point out that Bandits From Shaolin is pretty neatly shot thanks to cinematographer Danny Lee Yau Tong, who started his career in the Shaw Brothers in the late 60s before he joined everyone else in their move to Golden Harvest only a few years later. Lee would go on to shoot many of Huang's titles as well as films such as The Skyhawk, Iron Fisted Monk, Encounters Of A Spooky Kind, Police Story 2, Armour Of God, Duel To The Death, and many more. While it wasn't amazing in any way or as crammed with martial action as I had hoped, Bandits From Shantung was still quite an enjoyable flick and offered enough great fight action courtesy of the legendary Sammo Hung!

Fans should also keep an eye out for young stuntmen and actors such as Mars, Chin Suet Yang, Wilson Tong, Law Keung, and others...

Overall: An early classic from Golden Harvest studios, Bandits From Shantung proves to be a lot of fun and offers plenty of great kung-fu action!

DVD Extras: Trailer, Photo Gallery

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BANGKOK ADRENALINE

(Thailand 2009) 

Directed by Raimund Huber Produced by Trit Charoenrach, Chariyawan Tavoranon Action by Daniel O'Neill, Gwion Jacob Miles, Marky Lee Campbell, Tim Man, Ron Smoorenburg, Pangrech Sangcha Starring: Daniel O'Neill, Gwion Jacob Miles, Conan Stevens, Raimund Huber, Praya Lundberg, Lex De Groot, Dom Hetrakul, Tim Man Reviewing: Optimum UK DVD Release Genres: Martial Arts / Action / Comedy

Rating - 2 / 5

DVD Synopsis: An exotic island of hidden pleasures where the nights are long and the women are as hot as the tropical climate. It's the perfect location for a bunch of fun loving guys in search of an overseas adventure. But when a sweltering night of hardcore gambling goes horribly wrong, a group of naïve backpackers find themselves indebted to a local mafia boss. Their only way of escaping execution is to agree to kidnap the daughter of a tyrannical millionaire. It's a deadly mission that results in them being hunted down by a merciless mafia boss, a demented tycoon and a crazed milita of martial arts assassins out for blood. Thrust into a violent criminal underworld they must fight for survival in the only way they know how: by kicking ass! Written by and starring mountainous action star Conan Stevens, Bangkok Adrenaline also features Jackie Chan Stunt Team veteran Daniel O'Neill. Bringing martial arts action cinema into a new decade, Bangkok Adrenaline laughs in the face of CGI with some of the most amazing fight sequences and death defying, wireless stunts caught on film. (90 Mins)

Views: This independent Thai film was penned by an Aussie, directed by a Dutchman, and led by Englishmen. Each of these men have clearly spent a lot of time in Thailand, and have gained the support of the film community there, but my god, I only wish they would have refined a lot of things here before starting production. Bangkok Adrenaline tells the tale of four backpackers who arrive in Thailand to party and have a good time. But when a gambling game goes wrong and leaves their lives at risk, the friends decide to kidnap a billionaires daughter which doesn't quite go to plan when her father starts using her kidnapping as a means to further his own interests!

Bangkok Adrenaline is so badly written, directed and acted, you feel like its 90 minute running time doubles in length as you painfully sit through the dreadful comedy sequences – most of which director and co-star Raimund Huber is responsible for along with co-writer and giant, Conan Stevens. Its completely unfunny, delivered with poor comic timing and happens way too much. So much so in fact, that apart from the lengthy (and messy) end fight, Huber focuses way too much on trying to portray himself as a comic actor rather than letting the action happen. That said, I know the trials and tribulations of making your first movie (although I'm sure their budget here was quite a big larger than my own), so I can see past the technical flaws of Huber's debut respectively – but some things just don't work. Regardless, Raimund has went onto make a few films now including Kill 'em All that features Gordon Liu, Dragonwolf, and 13 Lost – a documentary on the Thai cave rescue in 2018. Conan Stevens, of course, has starred in a few Thai productions including Muay Thai Giant and Force Of Five, as well as Yuen Woo Ping's True Legend and Hollywood outings such as Game Of Thrones, The Hobbit, and more – but even he is dreadful in this and doesn't get to do much in the way of action. Unfortunately the same must be said for the handsome Gwion Jacob Miles has the looks and the moves, but his acting isn't the best. That isn't helped by his trying to be a tough guy with a posh English accent. Miles would return to work with Huber a few years later on Dragonwolf and appear in the Scott Adkins vehicle Zero Tolerance soon after. In fact, if I'm to be completely honest the only saving grace of Bangkok Adrenaline is the gorgeous Daniel O'Neill who looks amazing on screen, in action, and in his brief on-stage strip-bar scene which was worth the price of the DVD alone. Dan, who plays Dan in the film, was lucky enough to get to Hong Kong in the early 2000's to be a stunt performer and/or bit-player on films such as Gen-Y Cops, Jackie Chan's Accidental Spy and The Medallion, The Twins Effect, and Naked Weapon, as well as delivering some stunts in Tony Jaa's Tom Yum Goong. The English born actor and martial artist looks incredible in his moves, and I only wish we could see more of him – and preferably under the eyes of a better director – although he hasn't done anything in some time now since his short films such as The Fixer and Alone.

The team behind the fight-action is pretty decent, including a young Tim Man (who gets a brief fight against O'Neill), Ron Smoorenburg and others, resulting in some fun fights. But it's the scenes between Dan's fights that are often boring and drag on far too long. I must also point out that the direction and cinematography jumps from flat to WTF with the making of documentary on this DVD release proving to be shot better. If I were Huber, I'd stop getting in front of the camera and re-edit this film into a short that shows the amazing Daniel O'Neill fighting his way across Bangkok to save his friends. Perhaps that might give this very uneven, messy and below average flick a new lease of life...

Overall: Painful to watch for the most of it, but Bangkok Adrenaline is worth sitting through to see Daniel in action!

DVD Extras: Behind The Action Documentary, Trailer

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BANGKOK ASSASSINS

(Thailand 2011) 

(aka) Bangkok Kung Fu; Bangkok Kick

Directed by Yuthlert Sippapak Produced by Thanawat Thamprechapong Action by Somchai Munma Starring: Mario Maurer, Athikit Pringprom, Jarinya Sirimongkolsakul, Arak Amornsupasiri, Tomo Visava Thaiyanont, Abid, Kefi Adwen, Mathee Singruang Reviewing: MVM UK DVD Release Genres: Martial Arts / Drama

Rating - 3 / 5

DVD Synopsis: Kidnapped and forced into a life on the harsh streets of Bangkok, four youths are mentored by a skilled Shaolin Master. Learning the ancient secrets of kung fu, they become a force to be reckoned with. When their beloved Master is murdered, vengeance is the path they must follow and nothing had better get in their way! (104 Mins)

Views: This surprising Thai flick begins about 10 years before its main time-line where we see how a gang of insecure men kidnap kids and abuse them, before using them as beggars and who-knows-what-else. After 3 brothers try to escape, they are re-captured and brought back to the gang's leader to be brutally attacked. The attack leaves one with brain damaged, one deaf, and one blinded after the gang boss stabs him in the eyes with a skewer. A fourth boy, Pong, who was just kidnapped the night before, witnesses the abuse and screams for help – resulting in the cutting of his tongue which leaves him mute! It's safe to say that the opening of Bangkok Assassins is quite a dark introduction for it's audience, lightened only by the arrival of an old kung-fu master and his adopted granddaughter who save the boys by using some old-school, mystical kung-fu. As we jump 10 years forward, the kids have now grown up into handsome teens (especially the gorgeous Tomo Visava Thaiyanont), and have been trained as masters of kung-fu themselves. Together, they set out to find their abusers so that they can take revenge and get on with their lives. As another few years pass, Pong leaves to move on with his life and find love, the blind brother gives driving a go with the help of his the deaf bother, and the sister is still trying to get into the X-Factor after numerous and hilarious failed attempts over the years. But the retarded brother Naa (now played by the very handsome Mario Maurer), has stayed with the master at his temple to continue learning kung-fu and more. But it's clear that the master has made many enemies in his life, and soon, a gang of foreigners turn-up to assassinate him. As it turns out, the master was once part of the Jantra Alliance – a group of kung-fu masters in Thailand who have possession of a mystical Dragons Tear Stone – a magical stone put in Naa to save his life. But the monkey-faced ninjas, led by an unknown westerner, have been sent out to retrieve the stone which leads to the death of their master by a man who has kung-fu powers unlike anything the brothers have ever seen before!

When I first watched Bangkok Assassins I was left somewhat underwhelmed, but upon revisiting it, I can actually see what a well-written and well-made movie it actually is. Sure, the guys aren't genuine fighters by any means at all, but they do their best and look good doing it. Each of them gain a certain power which aids them in their battles (as in they wave their hands around to send someone flying), but its not over-used and the CGI is passable when it does come about. While the film starts with a serious message and has many dramatic moments throughout, it also cheers the audience up with some genuinely funny 'Chow Sing Chi style' comedic moments, although without ever detracting from anything meaningful. One example comes courtesy of the young girl (played by Kaew Jarinya Sirimongkolsakul), who is actually quite hilarious at times as she constantly tries to get selected for the local X-Factor show, and constantly fails miserably with every attempt. It's clear that writer and director Yuthlert Sippapak is a huge fan of Hong Kong cinema and especially that of its golden years as he combines some nice action (albeit definitely not enough for a film marketed in the action genre) with enough 'mo lie tau' comedy blended in to make it work. While it has it's flaws, Bangkok Assassins is shot wonderfully, carries a nice pace and is one of the better films I've seen from Thailand in some time that doesn't involve Tony Jaa or Jaa wanna-be who wants to be the next Ong Bak. While the ending isn't a glorious, martial arts packed finale as one had hoped, it still ties things up well and ends with a nice twist and plenty of emotion...

Overall: While hardly original, Bangkok Assassins is still a well-made film and entertaining modern take on the old-school kung-fu film!

DVD Extras: Trailers

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BANGKOK DANGEROUS

(Thailand 2000) 

Directed by Danny Pang, Oxide Pang Produced by Nonzee Nimibutr Starring: Pawarith Monkolpisit, Premsinee Ratanasopha, Patharawarin Timkul, Pisek Intrakanchit, Korkiate Limpapat, Piya Boonnak Reviewing: Tartan Asia Extreme UK DVD Release Genres: Action / Thriller / Drama

Rating - 3 / 5

DVD Synopsis: One of the very best of Asia Extreme is a neon-slicked underworld crime drama directed by Danny Pang and Oxide Pang, the celebrated twin brother team behind contemporary classic, The Eye. Kong is a deaf-mute hit man who carries out his violent and bloody work with a detached, sociopathic coldness. When he falls in love with an innocent pharmacist, Fon, he experiences warmth and tenderness for the first time and sets out on the path of ultimate redemption. (102 Mins)

 

Views: I'm going to be honest and the majority of you probably won't like it, but I've been trying to get through Bangkok Dangerous for the last 20 years and after finally getting round to it (in one complete sitting) I wasn't really blown away. The story tells the tale of Kong, a deaf & mute hitman who lives in Bangkok with his assassin partner Joe and stripper girlfriend Aom. As they continue to do the dirty work and assassinate rival gang leaders from Thailand to Hong Kong, their boss rises the underworld ranks. Kong soon meets Fon, a good mannered pharmacist who shows him some kindness and warmth – emotions he has never experienced since early childhood – and the pair quickly form feelings for each other. But after his friend Aom is raped by another gang member, and Joe killed by their boss, Fong must reveal his deadly skills to avenge his friends and start a new life with the girl he loves!

 

It's not that I disliked Bangkok Dangerous, but I really just couldn't get overly excited about it. Sure it looks great with its neon-lit night photography and kaleidoscope of colours, as well as some slick editing and great cinematography that was clearly inspired by the modern classics of Hong Kong cinema, but I kept finding myself losing interest – and not for the first time since I began trying to watch this film over two decades ago. Saying that, it's quite clear that the Pang brothers did a fantastic job – going on to remake Bangkok Dangerous as a Hollywood feature about 8 years later with Nicholas Cage in the leading role. Admittedly, I only watch Nic Cage movies when no-one is looking but I haven't even entertained the idea of checking out the remake. Starting their careers in Hong Kong as colourists and editors, the Pang brothers pulled together at the turn-of-the-century to direct Bangkok Dangerous, and while I definitely preferred their follow-up feature The Eye much more, I knew the pair were worth keeping an eye on. Whether working together or not, Danny and Oxide went on to secure a name for themselves as successful directors with films such as The Eye 2 & 3, Leave Me Alone, The Tesseract, Ab-normal Beauty, The Detective, Re-cycle, The Storm Warriors, Conspirators, and Fairy Tale Killer, as well as many more.

 

Pawarith Monkolpisit does a great job as Kong, the deaf/mute hitman who finally finds love. Although this film stands as his feature film debut, the actor has went on to star in a small number of films over the last 20 years including romantic comedy Promise Me Not, The Elephant King, Dante Lam's brilliant Operation Mekong, and the Hong Kong action-thriller Heroes Return alongside the great Yuen Biao and Ray Lui. Likewise, the rest of the main cast were relatively unknown with few of them going on to do much more. While it made for a great debut and opened the doors for the Pang Brothers to become the directors they are today, Bangkok Dangerous plays like the bastard child of Wong Kar Wai and John Woo, offering up very little that we haven't seen before but is still neatly packaged in a very well made movie. Ultimately though, one shouldn't really be too critical of a debut as great as this one. While it didn't do much for me, Bangkok Dangerous has gained much critical praise around the world and is worth the watch...

 

Overall: Well directed and beautifully shot, Bangkok Dangerous plays like a love-letter to the Hong Kong movies of yesteryear and makes for an impressive debut!

DVD Extras: Tartan Asia Extreme Trailer Showcase

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THE BANQUET

(China/Hong Kong 2006) 

Original Title: Ye Yan (aka) Legend Of The Black Scorpion; The Night Banquet

Directed by Feng Xiao Gang Produced by John Chong Action by Yuen Woo Ping, Yuen Cheung Yan, Yuen Shun Yee Starring: Daniel Wu, Zhang Ziyi, Ge You, Zhou Xun, Ma Jing Wu, Huang Xiao Ming, Ma Lun, Zhou Zhong He, Zeng Qiu Sheng, Bin Xiang Reviewing: Megastar HK DVD Release Genres: Drama / Martial Arts / Historical

Rating - 5 / 5

Megastar HK DVD Synopsis: The Banquet is set in ancient China during the Period of Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms, when dynasties succeed each other rapidly in the north and a dozen of independent states vie with one another in the south. Meanwhile, the neighbouring Khitan Empire is on the prowl in Manchuria, ready to conquer China when the moment arises (131 Mins)

 

In2Film/Metrodome UK DVD Synopsis: A spectacular, dazzling and bloody re-imagining of Shakespeare's legendary Hamlet, 'The Banquet' is an epic tale of revenge, violence and betrayal. Locked in a loveless marriage Empress Wan (international superstar Zhang Ziyi) is desperate to keep her forbidden love for Prince Wu Luan (Daniel Wu), from a family divided by cruelty and oppression. When the Emperor suddenly dies, his conniving younger brother Li takes up the throne forcing Wan to marry him. Convinced that this is the only way to protect all she loves from being destroyed by this new power hungry tyrant, Wan agrees. But Wu Luan refuses to see his love snatched away through such evil, greed and deception. After repeated attempts on his life amid furious confrontations with the new Emperor's imperial assassins, Wu Luan resolves to return to the palace and take revenge for himself, his beloved and a nation in the grip of a murderous madman. Featuring astonishing, career-topping action from the infamous Yuen Wo Ping (Kill Bill, The Matrix and Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon) and a cast featuring some of Asia's most acclaimed cinema icons, The Banquet is like no other epic you have ever witnessed. (125 Mins)

 

Views: It seems that director Feng Xiao Gang can do no wrong! His 2006 loose adaptation of Hamlet is stunning in every possible way, giving revered epics such as Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon and House Of Flying Daggers, a run for their money. Set in the era of the Tang Dynasty and the time of Five Dynasties, The Banquet tells a tale of betrayal, murder, and love, which is all knitted together by many assassination attempts and wonderful performances from all involved. The handsome Daniel Wu stars as Wu Luan, the Crown Prince of the Tang Dynasty. For most of his life Wu Luan has been in love with Little Wan, but after his father takes her as his Empress it forces the young Prince into exile. As he studies music and dance, his wicked uncle murders the Emperor to steal the throne and soon sends assassins after his nephew. Escaping death, Wu Luan returns to the palace to take revenge for his father while eluding more attempts on his life, fall in love all over again, and survive the banquet on the 100th day of the new Emperor's rule!

 

Although working off the backbone of the famed Hamlet tale, Feng Xiao Gang adds enough of his own originality to make this stand out. After killing the Emperor, Wu's uncle sends out a troupe of deadly assassins to finish-off Wu in a stunning action scene at the amazing forest theatre. This set and action-piece are just beautiful and worth the price of admission alone, quickly confirming that The Banquet guarantees some breath-taking cinematography, slick direction, gorgeous art design, and exciting action sequences. As well as serving as the films executive producer, the incredible and world renowned Yuen Woo Ping handles the films wonderful fight choreography along with his brothers Yuen Cheung Yan and Yuen Shun Yee, and protégé Dee Dee Ku. From the aforementioned attack at the forest theatre to the second assassination attempt on Wu in the palace - that sees the crown prince take on a small army of guards in a training session before they exchange wooden swords for real ones - the fights are violently beautiful and offer just as much excitement as its critically acclaimed peers such as Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon, Hero, House Of Flying Daggers, for example – as well as delivering some of the Yuen Clan's most impressive work to date.

 

The main cast is incredible with Daniel Wu delivering one of his best roles to date as the crown prince who comes home to find his family in tatters, and further attempts on his life. Since making his film debut in 1998, wushu champion Wu has went on to become a big name in Hong Kong cinema and has starred in almost 70 films including Gen-X Cops, Purple Storm, Cop On A Mission, Naked Weapon, New Police Story, House Of Fury, Shinjuku Incident, The Man With The Iron Fists, and the critically acclaimed television show, Into The Badlands. As mentioned, I think this is one of the strongest and most impressive performances I've seen from Daniel, with the star offering some great emotional drama and incredible moments of action. Feng regular Ge You is as wonderful as always, playing the conniving and power hungry new Emperor who, having killed his own brother, is determined to get Wu out of the way in order to rule the kingdom. Having taken over the role initially offered to Gong Li (who passed due to scheduling conflicts with the equally as beautiful, Curse Of The Golden Flower), the beautiful Zhang Ziyi stepped into play the young Empress Wan. Impressing since her introduction in Zhang Yimou's film The Road Home, Zhang gained worldwide attention in Ang Lee's Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon and is as equally impressive here as always. Of course, there are many other recognisable faces who all put on a great show, including appearances by Huang Xiao Ming - Ip Man 2, Saving General Yang, and The Last Tycoon – and actress Zhou Xun from The Emperor & The Assassin, Beijing Bicycle, Confucius, Painted Skin 1 & 2, and The Yin Yang Master. Fans should also keep an eye out for a young Max Zhang, star of Master Z, Invincible Dragon, and SPL 2, who also appears as one of the stuntmen for the production...

 

Visually, The Banquet is just amazing. From the stunningly cinematography to its gripping and beautifully lit visuals, you can't help but be sucked in by every frame. From the scene where the assassins kill themselves on a bridge; with their blood dripping down through onto the guards below, to the wonderfully captured scenes of the highly detailed palace exterior (reportedly the largest set ever built in China) and even the brief but violent polo game, The Banquet is certainly never dull to look at courtesy of cinematographer Zhang Li, who also worked with Feng on A World Without Thieves and John Woo's epic Red Cliff 1 & 2. He is joined by cinematographer Xie Ze – who also worked on A World Without Thieves, as well as Feng Xiao Gang's Assembly, Kung Fu Dunk, An Empress & The Warriors, Treasure Hunter, and Woo Ping's epic True Legend – and prolific Hong Kong cinematographer Raymond Lam Fai Tai. Since beginning his work on the fun Esprit D'amour in1983, Lam has went on to shoot many great titles including Armour Of God, Sworn Brothers, Picture Of A Nymph, Burning Sensation, Magic Cop, Blade Of Fury, Mr. Nice Guy, Curse Of The Golden Flower, and Little Big Soldier; as well as many others. Between them, the trio fill every frame perfectly, highlighting the beautifully detailed work of the costumes, glorious sets, and stunning scenery in every shot.

 

With a dramatically dark end that takes place at the films titular banquet, Feng Xiao Gang sees his viewers off with a final monologue from Ziyi before she suffers her fate at the hands of an unknown assassin; with her life dying out to a beautifully haunting track sung by Jane Zhang and composed by the Oscar Winning composer Tan Dun. Famed for his work on Hero and Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, Dun looks after the films score in The Banquet delivering an equally beautiful soundtrack to accompany its grand visuals, dramatic and impressive action sequences that help make this a modern masterpiece of Chinese cinema!

 

Overall: An incredible piece of film-making and stunning cinematic experience make The Banquet one of Feng Xiao Gang's finest, and one that is highly recommended!

 

Megastar DVD Extras: Making Of Documentaries, Interviews, Behind The Scenes, Trailers, Promotional Materials, Photo Gallery, TV Spots

 

In2Film/Metrodome DVD Extras: Making of Documentary, Trailer

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BLACK CAT

(Hong Kong 1991) 

Original Title: Hei Mao

Directed by Stephen Shin Produced by Dickson Poon, Stephen Shin Action by Benz Kong,Poon Kin Kwan Starring: Jade Leung, Simon Yam, Thomas Lam, Louis Roth, Lauro Chartrand, Lee Diy Yue Reviewing: 88 Films UK Blu-ray Release Genres: Action / Thriller

Rating - 4 / 5

88 Films UK Blu-ray Synopsis: Not to be confused with the various retellings of Poe's famous tale, Black Cat is a high-octane Hong Kong action thriller that provides a hugely entertaining precursor to the likes of Tarantino's Kill Bill Vol. 1 (2003) and south Korean cult classic, The Villainess (2017). When Catherine (Jade Leung), a mentally disturbed young woman, is detained by the police after accidentally killing a truck driver, she finds herself part of a covert training system. Programmed as an assassin, having learned a host of new deadly skills, she becomes a lethal government weapon, codenamed Black Cat. Director Stephen Shin (Brotherhood, Easy Money, Black Cat 2), had initially intended to make a straight-up remake of Luc Besson's La Femme Nikita (1990) but when Disney bought out the rights he was forced to rethink. His solution was Black Cat, a slick, action-packed gun-toting thrill ride. (96 Mins)

Made In Hong Kong UK VHS Synopsis: After blowing away her sleazy attacker and an American cop during a vicious pit-stop rape, wild Chinese street kid Catherine (the exquisite Jade Leung) is offered an ultimatum by the suave and sinister Simon Yam (Bullet In The Head; Full Contact) – a new identity as a C.I.A. Killer, or the electric chair. Months of agonizing training later, reborn as Black Cat, she is unleashed on Hong Kong for her first mission of death. Assassination follows successful assassination, but the web of secrecy and deceit which surrounds her clandestine operations begins to threaten her own life and the lives of those around her as she is drawn towards inevitable bloody tragedy. Intense, explosive and sumptuously shot, Hong Kong mogul Dickson Poon's sexy and violent remake of Luc Besson's international hit 'Nikita' blasted Oriental femme fatale Jade Leung onto the big screen and spawned an immediate, equally successful sequel. (93 Mins)

Views: While it may have been influenced by the international success of Luc Besson's hit film La Femme Nikita from the year before, I have to say that I enjoyed Stephen Shin's Black Cat that little bit more. Of course, as a fan of Hong Kong cinema for almost 40 years, some people would say that I was just being bias – but I don't care. Jade Leung's explosive introduction as a Hong Kong action-starlet is just fantastic. From the gritty and violent opening that sees her get attacked and abused by a would-be rapist trucker, to the beatings she takes in jail from the officers on duty, Jade Leung proves her worth from the get-go and hardly lets-up until the films closing credits. Leung plays Catherine, young down-on-her-luck Chinese girl living in America who is abused and beaten by those around her, before being left for dead after a shot from a mysterious gunman. While hooked-up to her life support, the doctors implant a small micro-chip in her brain known as the Black Cat. Once she awakens, Catherine is visited by a CIA agent who explains the situation. Stealing his gun, she tries to escape from the facility but quickly finds that there is nowhere else to run. From there, the distraught and wounded girl is put through some painful and intense training in order to make her one of the CIA's deadliest assassins. Once ready, Catherine – now known as Black Cat – is sent on a number of missions to kill, but soon finds herself trying to keep a healthy work/life balance when she finds a new lover by her side as well as many secrets that burden her future!

I love Black Cat! It's fun,it's stylish, and it's violent, with some gorgeously framed cinematography and wicked stunt work. It has shades of John Woo's The Killer, Clarence Fok's Naked Killer, and Doug Liman's Bourne Identity (although long before that was around), and although it may not be perfect, the film still provides an incredible rush of entertainment that bagged Leung the award for Best Newcomer at the 11th Hong Kong Film Awards. While it dips its toes into the realm of Category 3 sex and violence, Black Cat only just manages to escape the infamous film rating due to some clever direction and editing – but there is still certainly enough nudity, brutality, and gritty action to keep fans of the genre hooked. The first half of the film is set in the United States, although has been quite obviously filmed in Canada for the most part which is made obvious by the stunning scenery in the majority of the shots. While she gets to work on one explosive assignment there, the Black Cat is then sent to Hong Kong (with the new name of Erica) where she is given a number of missions to take down weapons dealers, dodgy businessmen, and killers. It's here that she also meets Allen, a handsome tour-guide who she caught taking her picture right after a kill, and although he didn't actually witness her do it, Catherine still sets out to that evening to kill him at his home. But as she hides under his bed waiting for the right moment to strike, the assassin soon finds that he shares her love for the harmonica and catches sight of his sweet cheeks when he pops into the shower. Enamoured, Catherine has a change of heart and makes a point of meeting up with him the next day. Allen is played by Thomas Lam, a good looking actor that is probably more recognised for his television work as well as roles in films like the fun '92 Legendary La Rose Noire, Banana Club, and Midnight Caller, and although he does a decent enough job, I think it's fair to say that Lam doesn't exactly ooze the same screen presence as the likes of Andy Lau, Tony Leung Chi Wai, or even Simon Yam who also co-stars with him here. This, in turn, may provide one of the more lacking qualities of the film for some people, with many saying that his performance is quite bland in comparison to the energy portrayed by Leung. Of course, the great Simon Yam really needs no introduction and although he plays one of the few strong characters of the film, was really appearing in an extended bit-part as Leung's CIA handler and controller. This was only 1 of 13 films Yam would be starring in that year, so it's easy to forgive him for not being in every other scene – especially when half of the film was shot in Canada. Back in Hong Kong, Simon would be kept busy with films such as Queens High with Cynthia Khan, The Queen Of Gamble, Gigolo & Whore, Mission Of Condor, Bullet For Hire, In The Line Of Duty 7: Sea Wolves, and more. And finally popular western actor Louis Roth, the writer of Ringo Lam's Undeclared War, and assistant director of Moon Lee's fun Little Heroes Lost In China (of which was also his last starring role before his death) appears as one of Simon Yam's CIA superiors and man behind the Black Cat program...

For her 'first' leading role, Jade Leung was certainly given a challenge when bringing Catherine to life. As she had previously mentioned in an interview, the actress had only watched the original film once but refused to watch it again so that she could bring her own flavour to the character. In doing so, Jade managed to impress the jury enough at the Hong Kong Film Awards (winning Best Newcomer as mentioned) and carved a healthy enough career in the Hong Kong film industry from then on. After living with her parents in Switzerland for a number of years, the former model returned to Hong Kong in 1990 to participate in the Miss Asia beauty pageant. She was soon then discovered by Dickson Poon and Stephen Shin to star in Black Cat, where she would sign-up for a six picture deal for D&B Films after the films great success. But after Black Cat 2: The Assassination Of President Yeltsin failed to deliver the same results, Jade's contract was revoked and the company (unfortunately) came to a close. It's such a shame considering how many great Hong Kong films D&B were behind, with titles such as The Return Of Pom Pom, Owl Vs Bumbo, Yes Madam, Where's Officer Tuba?, Royal Warriors, Legacy Of Rage, the Tiger Cage and In The Line Of Duty series – and so much more. Of course, Dickson Poon would be just as renowned as the tycoon owner of London's Harvey Nicholl's store, as well as owning a host of successful jewellery stores and being the former husband of the beautiful Michelle Yeoh – of whom he had also helped bring to the industry. From 1986 through to 1992, director and producer Stephen Shin worked exclusively for D&B Films starting with Brotherhood starring Danny Lee, and ending with Black Cat 2 respectively. But when the company shut down, Shin would continue to produce for more independent companies with films such as Zen Of Sword, Taxi Hunter, White Lotus Cult, and Sam The Iron Bridge – eventually directing his final piece of the 20th century with the wonderfully titled historical drama, The Great Conqueror's Concubine for Zhang Yimou in 1994. It would be almost a decade later that Shin would return to the directors chair with The Source of Love, and over a decade after that before returning once again with the U.S. co-produced feature, On Wings Of Eagles, starring Joseph Fiennes and Shawn Dou.

Apart from Jade Leung, there are two other things that really stand out for me in Black Cat. The first is the incredibly well-shot cinematography – captured by no less than 3 cameramen, and perhaps one for each location with the film having been shot in Canada, Hong Kong, and Japan. The first is Lee Kin Keung, a cinematographer who has captured many of Shin's works and titles including Tiger Cage 1 & 2, All's Well End's Well, Once Upon A time A Hero In China, Daughter Of Darkness 1 & 2, and Forbidden City Cop. He is joined by Cheng Siu Keung – the DOP of many great Hong Kong titles, including a host of Johnnie To films like The Mission, Running Out Of Time, Fulltime Killer, and Running On Karma, as well as being the director of the Shin produced White Lotus Cult and D&B Films very own In The Line Of Duty 6: Forbidden Arsenal and In The Line Of Duty 7: Sea Wolves with Cynthia Khan. Cheng would also serve on Black Cat as Shin's executive director. Then there is Wong Po Man, a DOP and cinematographer who has been behind such titles such as Happy Ghost 5, King Of Robbery, Drunken Monkey, Shanghai Shanghai, Operation Scorpio, First Shot, and many more. Between the the three of them, they have managed to deliver and incredible beautiful, artistic, and stunningly shot piece of Hong Kong cinema that has only been heightened even more by this stunning 2K restored Blu-ray release from 88 Films. The second would be the incredible action on offer from the film's action-directors Benz Kong and Poon Kin Kwan, both of whom make Jade Leung look like she's done this kind of thing for years as they deliver a host of powerful shoot-outs, stunts, and explosive action that highly impresses. Both names have been involved in the industry for some time, from acting to action-choreography in many great titles, with Kong going on to direct the fun Twins Mission for producer Tsui Siu Ming in 2007 – doubling up as the action-choreographer for it's stars Charlene Choi, Gillian Chung, Wu Jing, Sammo Hung, Yuen Wah, and many others. And I mustn't forget to mention that awesome soundtrack either!

Overall: Beautifully shot, action-packed, and debuting Jade Leung in an award winning role, Black Cat is a classic Hong Kong action movie of the early 90's well worth watching!

Blu-ray Extras: 2K Restoration, Audio Commentary with Mike Leeder & Arne Venema, Audio Commentary with Frank Djeng, Interview with Jade Leung, Trailers

Watch my unboxing video of this 88 Films release HERE

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BLACK CAT 2

(Hong Kong 1992) 

Original Title: Hei Mao 2: Ci Sha Ye Li Qin (aka) Black Cat 2: The Assassination Of President Yeltsin; Codename: Cobra

Directed by Stephen Shin Produced by Dickson Poon, Stephen Shin Action by Poon Kin Kwan Starring: Jade Leung, Robin Shou, Zoltan Buday, Bob Wilde, Alexander Skorokhod, Mike Miller, Jack Wong Reviewing: Mega Star HK DVD Release Genres: Action / Thriller

Rating - 3 / 5

Mega Star DVD Synopsis: The female assassin codenamed 'Black Cat' returns to the fray for a second thriller shot entirely on location in Europe. Cat (Jade Leung) is teamed with Robin 'Mortal Kombat' Shou in a bid to prevent the assassination of President Yeltsin. (87 Mins)

Views: I really don't know where to begin with Black Cat 2: The Assassination Of President Yeltsin. After watching the stunning 2K restoration of its predecessor from 88 Films, I couldn't wait to watch this sequel – of which I had only purchased on DVD from an Ebay seller about 2 months before. And although the quality was nowhere near as amazing as the Black Cat Blu-ray, it still made for a fun watch. That said, this film was nothing at all like I was expecting and definitely proved to be a different kettle of fish than the first chapter. The film kicks off with a quick reminder of part 1 that shows us how the bad memoires are affecting the Black Cat chip in her brain. Thankfully, Erica – renamed after gaining her secret identity in part one – is set for a free upgrade that erases her memories and drains whatever little emotion is left, from her poor self. This, in turn, makes her act more like The Terminator as opposed to the femme fatale from her previous missions, giving her the ability to defy gravity, scale buildings in heels, and jump great distances to land on top of moving vehicles. On top of that, Erica is now able to shoot the dick off a mouse with her new self-targeting eye that makes sure she never misses. Elsewhere in the States, CIA agent Robin (Robin Shou) is protecting a family who are in possession of a microfilm who are attacked by some hi-tec super-assassins. After their attack, the killers make a cool escape on snow boards which leads to an exciting downhill shoot-out. Around the halfway mark, after the now-cyborg-like Black Cat teams-up with Robin, they are sent to Russia for a new mission to protect President Yeltsin from an assassination. Here, they cross paths with the super-assassins that leads to an explosive showdown that takes Black Cat 2 to another level altogether!

While it definitely has some fun moments and memorable action scenes, I think it's fair to say that Black Cat 2 doesn't offer the same satisfaction as its predecessor having lost something along the way, with its uneven direction or lack of artistic flair. There may be a few different reasons for this, and one of which could be that it was written by a completely different team from before – although 3 in total once again. The first is Sin Kam Ching, an actor and writer who worked with D&B Films over the years – although Black Cat 2 would be his last screenplay to date. Interestingly enough, he would later work as the assistant director on Sam The Iron Bridge and Tales In The Wind a number of years later. The second is James Fung, a writer who has penned many great titles for Stephen Shin and Danny Lee including Brotherhood, Road Warriors, Against All, Final Justice, Red Shield, Best Of The Best, and White Lotus Cult, as well as working as the 2nd unit director on this project. But Black Cat 2 would be the debut of its third writer, Ivy Lee Mo King, who also served as the assistant director to Stephen Shin (the producer and director) which could indeed have been one of the major problems of the production. I found it an interesting choice to let Lee step into such a role for such a big production, and can only wonder what kind of sway she had on Shin and Dickson Poon to win such a job. The other reason I feel that things went a little tits-up here, was the lack of action-choreographer Benz Kong who had been a big part of the first Black Cat film. Although Poon Kin Kwan worked alongside Kong previously and has delivered the action on many great titles over the years such as Seven Warriors, An Eternal Combat, Flirting Scholar, Kung Fu Cult Master, and Forbidden City Cop (many of which were with Benz Kong) – it's possible that he maybe just got carried away with things here, taking Erica's cyborg upgrade down another road completely. But that said, and on its own merits, the action in Black Cat 2 can be highly entertaining at times...

As mentioned, there is the action-packed introduction of Robin Shou's character set in a mountain ski-lodge that sees two super-assassins open fire on anything that moves. After the get their hands on the micro-film, the heavily armored pair escape by jumping out the window and flawlessly landing on their snowboards, taking off immediately with a small army of CIA agents on skis behind them. It's a chase that is packed with great stunts and explosions that pre-dates Jackie Chan's similar action-scene in First Strike, by 4 years. A brief fight in an air-hanger follows that pits Jade against Robin, and is really just an excuse to show-off the formers new super strength and abilities with another gunfight following that sees a couple of rogue gunmen shooting at an army blockade. Then poor Robin soon finds that he has his hands full after Jade slips away to assassinate an innocent old woman at point-blank range in a shopping mall, in one of the films more brutal moments. It's fair to say that the fights and action on offer are definitely more 'typically' Hong Kong in their execution, with strands of comedy making them seem almost silly at times and have plenty of wire-enhanced wildness to enjoy. One of my favourite action scenes (and possibly the most exciting fight overall) has to be the one that takes place in the iron factory, just before the one-hour mark. It reminded me a lot of the similarly themed construction-site fight scenes in Sammo Hung's Heart Of The Dragon, Skinny Tiger & Fatty Dragon, and Pantyhose Hero – albeit a little less polished, but still exciting enough that results in Jade getting smashed in the face by a tank of sorts. The grand finale is kind of wild involving Jade exploding a plane from her stolen convertible, before battling the super-assassin in a blend of choreography that looks like it came from an early 90s Ching Siu Tung film – or one of Philip Ko's Filipino efforts such as Lethal Panther 2 or Ultracop 2000.

It was inevitable that Jade would have to follow-up with a sequel to her 'first' award-winning lead role, and the character of Black Cat. After living with her parents in Switzerland for a number of years, the former model returned to Hong Kong in 1990 to participate in the Miss Asia beauty pageant where she was soon discovered by Dickson Poon and Stephen Shin to star in Black Cat. Thanks to its success, Jade would sign-up for a six picture deal for D&B Films, but after this sequel failed to deliver the same results, her contract was revoked and the company (unfortunately) came to a close. Regardless, Jade has went on to star in a number of great films over the years including Satin Steel, Spider Woman, Fox Hunter, Leopard Hunting, Flying Dragon Leaping Tiger, Kung Fu Mahjong, Line Walker, and the New Kung Fu Cult Master alongside Donnie Yen. Leung also appeared in two unrelated sequels to the Black Cat franchise such as Black Cat In Jail and The Black Cat Agent Files, but I wouldn't say they'd be worth tracking down in a hurry. The great Robin Shou shines as his self-titled character, getting to show off some pretty cool moves (although nearly not enough in my opinion) and takes part in some great action scenes, as well as getting to deliver a strong performance overall. Although he had only been in the business for about 5 years by this stage, Shou had managed to star in over 15 films including many for D&B Films. Of course, it would only be a few years after this that Robin would get the chance to move to Hollywood with a leading role in Mortal Kombat, that saw him play the much-loved character of Liu Kang – and again in its sequel soon after. It was nice to see a huge western cast being put to good use, and eagle eyed viewers should keep an eye out for Australian actor Mike Miller in the iron factory-fight – with the martial artist having appeared in many titles over the 90s including Once Upon A time In China 2, Pom Pom & Hot Hot, Bodyguard From Beijing, Knock Off, and The Black Sheep Affair...

Cheng Siu Keung returns as the DOP once again, and manages to deliver some strong visuals that could look even better with a restored Blu-ray release. He is backed by Leung Lik Ji who went on to shoot the Cheng Siu Keung directed, Stephen Shin produced, White Lotus Cult the following year and One Arm Hero after that – both of which are known to be part of the brilliant, Sam The Iron Bridge Trilogy – and Chris Lee Chi Wa, a cinematographer that started as a focus-puller on many D&B productions before going on to work on titles such as the Sam The Iron Bridge Trilogy, The Grandmaster, John Woo's Manhunt, Donnie Yen's Enter The Fat Dragon, and Jackie Chan's Vanguard. Having watched Black Cat 2 a couple of times now, I can't help but feel that my DVD version has been cut in some way, with scenes and edits that seem to just stop or start at odd moments. If this was the version presented to HK audiences I can see what they didn't like it, but at the same time, I have to say that the film isn't completely dreadful and does entertain to some degree!

Overall: While flawed in many ways, Black Cat 2 still has its moments and offers some wild action!

DVD Extras: Synopsis, Trailers

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THE BOXER FROM SHANTUNG

(Hong Kong 1972) 

Original Title: Ma Yong Zhen (aka) The Killer From Shantung

Directed by Chang Cheh, Pao Hsueh Li Produced by Runme Shaw Action by Lau K. Leung, Lau K. Wing, Tong Gai, Chan Chuen Starring: Chen Kuan Tai, Ching Li, David Chiang, Tien Ching, Ku Feng, Chiang Nan, Feng I, Cheng Kang Yeh, Chen Hao Reviewing: Arrow Video Shaw Scope Blu-ray Release Genres: Martial Arts / Drama

Rating - 5 / 5

Arrow Video Blu-ray Synopsis (Book): Ma Yongzhen, a modest young patriot, leaves Shantung to seek his fortune in Shanghai. On arrival he is befriended by Xiao Jiangbei. When the two are involved in a fight, underworld leader Tan Si sees and notes Ma's fighting techniques and tries to entice him into evil ways. Though impressed, Ma is sceptical, but soon, in another fight, he sides with Tan Si's men against gangster Yang Shuang's thugs. When he hears that a foreign wrestler is challenging the public to floor him, Ma decides to try his luck. He defeats the wrestler and angers Yang Shuang. A fight starts, and Ma routs the thugs and collects his winnings. Later he incurs the displeasure of his girlfriend, Jin Lingzi when he gains more territory and his reputation as a boxer increases. The feud between Yang Shuang and Tan Si continues, and Tan is murdered by Yang's men. Ma plans to avenge his death, but Yang is aware of this and lures the unsuspecting Ma into a trap, where he is fatally wounded by Yang's thugs. Ma kills Yang before he himself dies, and his dreams of fortune in Shanghai are ended. Saddened by the death of their friend, both Xiao Jiangbei and Jin Lingzi leave Shanghai. (134 Mins)

Views: Loosely based on the story of the real Ma Yong Zhen, The Boxer From Shantung shifts its settings forward a century to a time when China's warlords were wreaking havoc across the land. The incredible Chen Kuan Tai solidifies his place as a leading man in the role of Ma, lighting-up the screen with his strong performance and energetic martial arts that gives fans one of Cheh's more epic pieces. It was evident to see that Chen knew just how much of an impact he made as Ma, as he went on to reinvent the story for his 4th directorial piece in 1979 with Big Boss Of Shanghai – a film which is actually just as exciting. Interestingly enough, both films were penned by prolific screen-writer Ni Kuang, a jman who made his debut in 1967 with the Chang Cheh directed classic, One-Armed Swordsman. By the time this film had come about, Kuang had written over 20 films – most of which were for the Shaw Brothers studio, and many that were for director Chang Cheh including Have Sword Will Travel, Vengeance, The Heroic Ones, The New One-Armed Swordsman, The Deadly Duo, and The Angry Guest. As well as a few small roles in Hong Kong movies over the years, Ni Kuang has proven to be one of the industries most successful writers with over 300 published novels and 400 films scripts completed over a few decades, and has delivered the scripts for some of the greatest Hong Kong movies since the late 60s...

In a classic rags-to-riches story, Ma Yong Zhen arrives in town with his good friend Xiao where he soon finds himself caught-up in a turf war between warring gangs, the Tans and the Yangs. Although he is seen as a bum, Ma quickly makes a name for himself thanks to his cool attitude and strong martial arts abilities. While respected by Tan Si, Ma finds himself constantly harassed and attacked by the Yang clan – more famously known about town as the Axe Gang – although proves to handle himself well enough. But as Ma climbs the ranks and makes a name for himself, master Yang conspires with his men to get rid of master Tan and entrap Ma so they can bring him down once and for all. It all boils down to a violent and bloody 20 minute finale that sees the lone warrior taking on hundreds of men single-handedly with an axe lodged in his stomach, and hardly a single piece of furniture left intact!

Due to the great success of The Boxer From Shantung, there were many sequels released soon after – although none of which were truly official in the sense. The first would be Man Of Iron (released in the US as Warrior Of Steel) which would be directed once again by Chang Cheh and Pao Hsueh Li. The film opens with a narration of what happened in Boxer From Shantung, although it actually takes place 20 years later with Chen playing a different character this time, as do the majority of the main cast who also returned. An unofficial sequel of sorts was made the same year that saw the wonderful Judy Lee in her debut role in the brilliant Queen Boxer (aka The Avenger). Here, she plays the sister of Ma who comes to town to avenge his death and takes on the deadly Axe Gang in an equally brutal finale. A similar film was made in 1973 called The Sister Of The Shantung Boxer, that saw King Boxer co-star Wang Ping play Ma's sister. Both films would be made independently along with another title called Queen Of Fist, a story that tells the tale of Ma's mother and siblings seeking revenge for his death – known more famously as Kung Fu Mama. There have no doubt been more iterations of the film and other spin-off titles made over the years, with the renowned Axe Gang showing up in numerous titles over the years including Jackie Chan's Drunken Master 2 and Chow Sing Chi's Kung Fu Hustle.

It was also interesting to note that The Boxer From Shantung was supported by two assistant directors, who each went on to become major names of Hong Kong cinema themselves. These guys were John Woo and Godfrey Ho, both of whom became renowned for their own different styles and contributions to the film world in the decades to follow. The film also benefited from having no less than 4 of the Shaw Brothers top fight choreographers with Lau Kar Leung, Lau Kar Wing, Tong Gai, and Chan Chuen. Of course, these guys had already been working together for some time on many Shaw Brothers movies as action-directors, but had been involved in the business for many years before. Tong was a martial arts student of Yuen Woo Ping's father, the late Simon Yuen Hsiao Tieng, and started his career as an actor in the mid-50s before going on to star in over 130 films through to the late 90s. He made his debut as a choreographer in 1962's The Flaming Mountain going-on to work as the action-director of almost 200 films through to the early 90s, with Tsui Hark's Green Snake being his final project. Tong also directed a few of his own titles for Shaw Brothers in 1983 and 84 such as Shaolin Prince, Shaolin Intruders, and the awesome Opium & The Kung Fu Master. Lau Kar Leung started on a similar path as Tong, although began his role as a martial-arts director at the same time and went onto star in well over 200 films, choreograph over 170, and become one of the most famous Hong Kong directors of his time with titles such as 36th Chamber Of Shaolin to 8 Diagram Pole Fighter, and Tiger On The Beat to Drunken Master 2 delivering some of his finest moments. Leung passed in 2013 at 77 years of age, due to cancer. Lau Kar Wing joined the industry a decade later and quickly followed in his big brothers footsteps in every department, starring alongside him in many classic titles and directing hit films such as Odd Couple, Treasure Hunters, The Dragon Family, and the fantastic Skinny Tiger, Fatty Dragon with his good friend Sammo Hung. And last but not least, actor Chan Chuen started with the Shaw Brothers in the late 60s and made his debut as a martial-arts director on Wu Ma's The Protectors in 1971. The same year would see him team-up with Kar Wing on The Swift Knight and The Oath Of Death, before everyone came together on this the following year. Later that decade, Chan would make his debut as a director with the fun Kung Fu Vs Yoga, going on to deliver films like Two Fists Against The Law, Energetic 21, Fearless Hyena 2, and Friendly Ghost. Between the four of them, fans get to enjoy a host of exciting fight scenes throughout The Boxer From Shantung – with the choreography getting stronger and better as the film rolls along. Of course, the best of it comes during the grand finale as Ma takes on a small army of gang members and uses everything (and anything) around him as a weapon. It's a brutal and bloody battle, and one of my favourite closing scenes of any kung-fu movie!

As mentioned, Chen Kuan Tai is just brilliant as Ma Yong Zhen, the heroic boxer who lets no-one walk over him. As one of the Shaw Brothers first real, true martial-arts trained actors, Chen started of as a bit-player before getting his big break with The Boxer From Shantung. Around the same time, he tried his hand as both a producer and fight choreographer on films like The Crazy Instructor, Cold Blade, The Chase, and Invincible Iron Palm. As the roles came flooding in after the success of The Boxer From Shantung, Chen soon got round to making his directorial debut with The Simple Minded Fellow – a comedy starring James Yi Lui and Dean Shek – but it would be his second film as a director that would anger the bosses back at Shaw Brothers, with Iron Monkey proving to be quite the hit. Chen's next directional effort was Invincible Monkey Fist, that saw him star alongside the brilliant Billy Chong as well as starring in Tough Guy – a loose sequel to his Iron Monkey feature also known as Iron Monkey Strikes Back. To settle things with his old bosses, Chen agreed to return to the studios for a role in Crippled Avengers and continued to jump between his independent titles and Shaw Brothers to deliver films such as the fantastic Shaolin Kingboxer (aka Iron Fists), Killer Constable, The Master, his aforementioned Big Boss From Shanghai, and many more. To date, Kuan Tai has starred in over 160 features – even appearing in modern hits such as Derek Kwok's Gallants, 14 Blades, Dragon Tiger Gate, 7 Assassins, Once Upon A Time In Shanghai, and more. The wonderful Alan Cheng Kang Yeh, who is probably more recognisable to fans of Hong Kong cinema for his roles in Jackie Chan's Young Master and Dragon Lord, stars as Ma's best friend and loyal man-at-arms. Cheng made his debut with Shaw Brothers in The Dancing Millionairess in1964, before going onto have a lengthy career appearing in many of their greatest titles – and quite a few that were alongside Chen Kuan Tai. David Chiang stars in an extended cameo (of sorts) as Boss Tan Si, the good natured gang boss that appreciates Ma for who he is, with the two soon becoming friends further down the line. While I enjoyed him in the role, I did feel that he was only cast here as a back-up name to help sell some tickets – just in case Kuan Tai wasn't enough to draw a crowd. After all, Chiang was one of the studio's most bankable stars and had already been acting for a good 20 years (albeit from the age of 5), but Chen was most definitely the star of the show. Prolific actor Chiang Nan stars as Boss Yang, the twisted leader of the Axe Gang which also included Shaw Brothers stars Ku Feng, Fung Ngai, Tin Ching, and Wong Ching. The wonderful Fung Hak On stars as David Chiang's coachman, with Bruce Tong, Hsu Hsia, and Yuen Yat Chor staring as friends of Chen Kuan Tai also. Shaw's regulars Shum Lo, Lee Man Tai, and Mama Hung make an appearance as well as Yen Shi Kwan, Yuen Shun Yi, Danny Chow, Brandy Yuen, Philip Ko Fei, Yuen Cheung Yan, and Yuen Woo Ping who pop-up throughout as extras...

Released as part of the gorgeous Shaw Scope Vol.1 box set from Arrow Video, this full uncut version runs for a strong 2 hours and 14 minutes – the first time I have been able to see the film in its entire glory. In the past, the US release was cut by a good 30 minutes which lost many important plot points, as well as many moments of graphic violence. But the German version was initially released even shorter at 80 minutes, which is almost missing half of the film (madness!!). Personally, I believe that any true fan of kung-fu cinema should aim to see The Boxer From Shantung in its uncut glory and for those that do, you'll most certainly not be disappointed!

Overall: A classic Shaw Brothers title and one of my favourite Chen Kuan Tai films, The Boxer From Shantung is an epic piece of kung-fu cinema and well worth the watch!

Blu-ray Extras: 2K Restoration of 4K Scan, Interview with Chen Kuan Tai, Interview with Assistant Director John Woo, Conversation between Chen Kuan Tai and Ku Feng, Trailers, TV Spot, Image Gallery

Watch my unboxing video of this Arrow Video release HERE

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BOXER REBELLION

(Hong Kong 1976) 

Original Title: Ba Guo Lian Jun (aka) The Bloody Avengers; Spiritual Fists

Directed by Chang Cheh Produced by Runme Shaw Action by Lau Kar Leung Starring: Alexander Fu Sheng, Chi Kuan Chun, Leung Kar Yan, Jenny Tseng, Johnny Wang Lung Wei, Hu Chin, Bruce Tong, Sun Yueh, Li Li Hua, Richard Harrison, Chiang Tao, Jamie Luk, Gordon Liu, Philip Kwok, Fung Hak On, Stephen Yip Reviewing: Black Hill/Koch Media German Blu-ray Release Genres: Martial Arts / Drama / Historical

Rating - 3.7 / 5

Blu-ray Synopsis: In The Beijing Uprising, the godfather of kung fu film, Chang Cheh, tells a lavishly staged war story of disappointment and revenge with the help of the internationally acclaimed cast around Alexander Fu Sheng and Wang Lung Wei. The Boxer Rebellion was one of the most incredible events in China in long history. Angered by the interference of Western powers in their country, the masses trust the rioters' claims that they have developed bulletproof kung fu. The reality of firearms is catching up with them. There is a mass murder of the Boxer revolutionaries. Although Beijing will soon be occupied, the heroes do not give up... (143 Mins)

 

Views: Chang Cheh's sprawling epic is a historical drama based on real events – albeit with some artistic licensing, of course. Boxer Rebellion tells the story of the uprising of Chinese nationals who fought against the the threat of foreign rule, and the forced ways of the Christian church at the turn of the 20th Century. While there is certainly less fact and more fiction for the sake of entertainment, the film still delivers a strong story at a good pace with plenty of kung-fu action, and a strong cast to back it, seeing the events right through to the flight of the Empress Dowager when she abandoned Peking for Xi'an in the summer of 1900. While the British were part of this attack on China, it seems their role here was watered down somewhat – perhaps due to the fact that Hong Kong was still under British rule when the film was made, and in turn kept the Shaw Brothers studios out of trouble – with the Germans, Americans, Russians and Japanese shown as the main villains of the piece. Although sold as a kung-fu movie Boxer Rebellion plays more like a historical docu-drama at times, with black and white photographs of the actual events popping up every so often – some of which are actually quite harrowing and mirror the on-screen violence that was typical of Chang Cheh during this period!

 

The heroes of the hour are played by Alexander Fu Sheng, Chi Kuan Chun, and Leung Kar Yan – all of whom are as impressive as each other and look great in their roles. I've often mentioned that I'm not the biggest fan of Fu Sheng's, although its fair to say that the actor was undeniably charming and a bit more athletic here than usual while delivering a memorable performance as young cheeky hero who fights for his friends and country. Although he has often been referred to as the original 'clown prince of kung-fu' before Jackie Chan owned that title, I more often than not just found him to be irritating and annoying as opposed to funny – something that Jackie could deliver naturally for the most part. Still, I can't deny that over the last year or two with more and more Shaw Brothers titles hitting Blu-ray in their restored-original versions, I am growing to like Fu Sheng more and more each day. Boxer Rebellion would be the sixth feature kung-fu star Chi Kuan Chun would co-star in with Alexander, since his debut in 1974. In only 2 years, the pair would star in Chang's classics such as Men From The Monastery, Shaolin Martial Arts, Five Shaolin Masters, Disciples Of Shaolin, Marco Polo, and this. Of course, this wouldn't be the last of them with the pair going on to star in a number of other Shaw Brothers titles before Kuan Chun broke off from the studio at the end of '77. The incredible Leung Kar Yan joined the pair when he made his debut in Cheh's brilliant Shaolin Martial Arts, quickly following that with a role in Five Shaolin Masters and Marco Polo before going down a similar path to Chi Kuan Chun. As luck would have it, and only a couple of years later, Leung would have the privilege of joining Sammo Hung in a number of his productions where he would quickly excel to become one of kung-fu cinemas most recognisable faces. While the latter doesn't get to hang around for the grand finale, each of the stars get the chance to show off some fantastic kung-fu skills and all look great doing it. The brilliant Johnny Wang Lung Wei plays one of the main villains of the piece, who tricks his army of followers into believing that they have bulletproof skin – a gimmick seen in many Hong Kong movies over the years from Legendary Weapons Of China to Once Upon A Time In China 2. In essence, his character is just a coward and often takes credit for kills that were down by others; eventually proving his worth when he has to go up against Chi Kuan Chun towards the end. Another notable villain is that of General Waldersee who is played by Richard Harrison, the infamous IFD Films ninja and star of many 70s Italian sword and sandals movies. While he doesn't have as huge a part here like he would in the Godfrey Ho movies, he still makes an impression as the German general and gets to trade a few moves with Chi Kuan Chun and Fu Sheng in a short bout. Eagle-eyed fans should also keep an eye out for popular Venom, Philip Ko, who appears in a couple of minor roles throughout along with a young Gordon Liu, Jamie Luk, Chiang Tao, Stephen Yip, Fung Hak On, and Bruce Tong Yim Chan who gets a bit more to do before he faces-off against a red-hot Gatling gun.

 

The lively action scenes are handled by the legendary Lau Kar Leung, the who went onto take control of the Shaw Brothers studios after bringing Chang Cheh back down to earth with a bump. Lau had been directing the action for Chang since the mid 60s (often alongside Tong Gaai) and Boxer Rebellion would be his last. Having made his impressive directional debut just the year before with The Spiritual Boxer (not to mention co-directing Breakout From Oppression with Gordon Liu in 1973), Lau Kar Leung gave his old boss something to worry about when he directed Challenge Of The Masters around the same time as choreographing this. From there, Lau went on to deliver some of Hong Kong cinemas finest ever films – directing 25 in total, choreographing over 170, and starring in well over 200 until his passing in June of 2013. Although it boasts a cast of thousands and features many grand scenes of battle, Boxer Rebellion still offers enough great kung-fu action that will keep any fan of the Shaw Brothers or old-school Hong Kong cinema, more than happy. While typically Shaw's in its look and style, the film is still one of their many enjoyable titles that manages to highlight the horrors of war and skills of it's 3 young stars...

 

Overall: Beautifully scored and typical of the Shaw Brothers studio, Boxer Rebellion is another epic from Chang Cheh that is worth the watch!

 

Blu-ray Extras: Trailers, Photo Gallery

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